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London Film Festival ‘10 S&A Highlights – “A Screaming Man”

A Screaming Man stillOK, so Sergio already wrote a reveiw of this film last week but, given that I saw it a few days later and that it screens at this year’s London Film Festival, which starts next week… and that I loved it… Well, I figured it was worth mentioning again this week.

As you’re probably aware if you were anywhere near this site earlier in the year, Mahamet Saleh Haroun’s Un Homme Qui Crie (A Screaming Man) won the Jury Prize at Cannes Film Festival in May. The third in what could be said to be a trilogy of father-son themed films following Abouna (2002) and Daratt (2006), A Screaming Man is once again set in modern day Chad and, like Daratt, is set against the backdrop of war.

However, as is usual with Haroun’s films, loud, physical and external conflict is absent from the screen and attention placed, instead, on the quiet, internal conflict of man – in this instant, one man, Adam (aka Champ) played admirably by Youssouf Djaoro, a former national swimming champion, now a swimming pool attendant in a hotel which caters to white ex-pats, UN soldiers and wealthy Chadians, and now recently, and quite appropriately for modern day Africa, Chinese owned. Adam is assisted by his son, Abdel (French actor Diouc Koma) and looks set to glide blissfully into retirement, resting on his laurels until it’s time for his son to take over the hotel pool. However, Madame Wang (Heling Li), the hotel owner, has other ideas, turning Adam’s contentment into turmoil; his demotion to gatekeeper highlighting and exaggerating his conceit with the hilariously short and tight fitting uniform he’s forced to wear, a stark contrast to the hitherto crisp yet casual white shorts and t-shirt he admonishes his son for not keeping clean.

Unlike Abouna and Daratt, the father-son legacy in The Screaming Man presents us with a father who has neither abandoned his family nor who has died in warfare, but one who is not only present, but also seen to be very loving and tender with both his wife (Hadje Fatime N’Goua) and son, while still maintaining his place as head of the family with dignity, pride and discipline. While in Abouna and Daratt we’re presenting with sons on a quest to uphold family union and loyalty in the absence of a father, in A Screaming Man, it’s the father himself who abruptly brings to a halt the notion of any father-son legacy, especially one that does not place him front and centre and, despite Adam’s hitherto peaceful demeanor and his lack of interest in the progress of the war, suddenly it becomes a useful tool with which to fight his own battles – alas, to disastrous effect.

It’s Adam’s former colleague, David (Marius Yelolo), the former hotel cook who loses his job in the reshuffle and who later goes on to become fatally ill, who shows an alternative way for man to deal with his own sense of entitlement, a sense of entitlement that generally leads to discord and destruction far beyond each man’s immediate person. While coming to terms with his own plight with a calming mix of humor and philosophy David, in a moment of blasphemous yet matter of fact despair, takes God out of the equation, indirectly laying the responsibility of man’s fate in man’s own hands. This makes the events that occur as a result of Adam’s actions all the more harrowing and yet, despite man’s ill concieved plans, the legacy of inheritance, regardless of what form it might take, does not end, and this is brought home to Adam by his son’s girlfriend (Djénéba Koné), causing much contrition and regret on Adam’s part. Too late, perhaps for Adam and Abdel, but the legacy nonetheless continues.

A Screaming Man screens at the London Film Festival on the following dates:

Wednesday 20the October, 18:00 at Vue Leicester Square, Screen 7
Friday 22nd October, 16:00 at Ciné Lumière, South Kensington.

Visit the BFI London Film Festival website to book tickets and for further information.

London Film Festival ‘10 S&A Highlights – “A Screaming Man”

OK, so Sergio already wrote a review of this film last week but, given that I saw it a few days later and that it screens at this year’s London Film Festival, which starts next week, and that I loved it… Well, I figured it was worth mentioning again this week.

As you’re probably aware if you were anywhere near this site earlier in the year, Mahamet Saleh Haroun’s Un Homme Qui Crie (A Screaming Man) won the Jury Prize at Cannes Film Festival in May. The third in what could be said to be a trilogy of father-son themed films following Abouna (2002) and Daratt (2006), A Screaming Man is once again set in modern day Chad and, like Daratt, is set against the backdrop of war.

However, as is usual with Haroun’s films, loud, physical and external conflict is absent from the screen and attention placed, instead, on the quiet, internal conflict of man – in this instant, one man, Adam (aka Champ) played admirably by Youssouf Djaoro, a former national swimming champion, now a swimming pool attendant in a hotel which caters to white ex-pats, UN soldiers and wealthy Chadians, and now recently, and quite appropriately for modern day Africa, Chinese owned. Adam is assisted by his son, Abdel (French actor Diouc Koma) and looks set to glide blissfully into retirement, resting on his laurels until it’s time for his son to take over the hotel pool. However, Madame Wang (Heling Li), the hotel owner, has other ideas, turning Adam’s contentment into turmoil; his demotion to gatekeeper highlighting and exaggerating his conceit with the hilariously short and tight fitting uniform he’s forced to wear, a stark contrast to the hitherto crisp yet casual white shorts and t-shirt he admonishes his son for not keeping clean.

Unlike Abouna and Daratt, the father-son legacy in The Screaming Man presents us with a father who has neither abandoned his family nor who has died in warfare, but one who is not only present, but also seen to be very loving and tender with both his wife and son, while still maintaining his place as head of the family with dignity, pride and discipline. While in Abouna and Daratt we’re presenting with sons on a quest to uphold family union and loyalty in the absence of a father, in A Screaming Man, it’s the father himself who abruptly brings to a halt the notion of any father-son legacy, especially one that does not place him front and centre and, despite Adam’s hitherto peaceful demeanor and his lack of interest in the progress of the war, suddenly it becomes a useful tool with which to fight his own battles – alas, to disastrous effect.

It’s Adam’s former colleague, David, the former hotel cook who loses his job in the reshuffle and who later goes on to become fatally ill, who shows an alternative way for man to deal with his own sense of entitlement, a sense of entitlement that generally leads to discord and destruction far beyond each man’s immediate person. While coming to terms with his own plight with a calming mix of humor and philosophy David, in a moment of blasphemous yet matter of fact despair, takes God out of the equation, indirectly laying the responsibility of man’s fate in man’s own hands. This makes the events that occur as a result of Adam’s actions all the more harrowing and yet, despite his efforts, the legacy of inheritance does not end, but is brought home to him instead by his son’s girlfriend, causing much contrition and regret on Adam’s part. Too late, perhaps for Adam and Abdel, but the legacy nonetheless continues.

A Screaming Man screens at the London Film Festival on the following dates:

Wednesday 20the October, 18:00 at Vue Leicester Square, Screen 7

Friday 22 October, 16:00 at Ciné Lumière, South Kensington.

To book tickets, visit the BFI LFF website.

3 comments to London Film Festival ‘10 S&A Highlights – “A Screaming Man”

  • Not sure why the link’s not showing up in the post, but click HERE to link to the BFI London Film Festival website.

  • You’d think I’d have seen this by now, living in NYC, but oddly enough, it has yet to screen here. Surprised it wasn’t playing at the New York Film Festival, given that they screened several other Cannes titles. Oh well, I’m sure I’ll see it soon enough.

    Ideally, I’d love to see a film like this at one of the Stateside black film festivals, but the “politics” behind all that has been covered ad nauseam, here and elsewhere.

    • I’m surprised it’s not screening at NYFF as well. Mind you, it seems you have a more interesting array of films… Or maybe not so much more interesting (I’ve seen a few little gems so far that will probably never get beyond the festival circuit) but a a few films I’d like to have seen, like The Tempest and Venus Hottentot… Ho hum.